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Comparative Effectiveness of CET vs. SST in SMI (Serious Mental Illness)

Aim 1. We will test our hypothesis that CET will be associated with greater improvements than SST in both the primary outcome: community functioning (SAS, QLS), and the secondary outcomes of neuro- and social cognition (NIH Toolbox, PennCNB, and MSCEIT) and social skills (SSPA). For study Aim 1, we hypothesized that CET will be associated with greater improvements than SST in both the primary outcome: community functioning (SAS, QLS), and the secondary outcomes of neuro- and social cognition (selected NIH Toolbox and Penn CNB measures, and MSCEIT) and social skills (SSPA). Aim 2: We will explore differential effectiveness of the two interventions by baseline cognitive functioning and age. For Aim 2, we hypothesize that patients with less impairment in cognitive functioning at baseline will demonstrate relatively larger treatment gains in SST compared to those in CET than those who are initially more cognitively impaired, and that younger patients will benefit more from CET compared to those in SST than those who are older. The results of this study will address a key knowledge gap in the field and a decisional dilemma for clinicians. A pilot study at four treatment sites will be used to test the feasibility and acceptability of telementalhealth delivery of these two treatments, as compared to in-person delivery.